Going Zero Waste | Beeswax Wraps

In an effort to transition into a more low-waste home, another product I wanted to get rid from our kitchen was the saran wrap. After looking at alternative products on other blogs and Etsy, I realized making the switch proved fairly simple. First of all, if you don’t want to make anything, just invest in glass containers with lids. Done. No need for saran wrap. We have a few glass containers with lids for keeping our leftovers but I also wanted the option of having some type of thin cover to throw over a bowl that didn’t have an accompanying lid. Hence, beeswax wraps.

This project didn’t require any sewing. However, I did have to hunt the internet for a few things. I decided to purchase organic cotton fabric from honeybegood. Their fabric patterns were so cute! And it doesn’t hurt to spend a little more on organic fabrics when I know it may be touching my food. I also bought a block of beeswax from Amazon. One block was more than enough.

MATERIALS

  • Cotton fabric
  • Beeswax
  • Cheese grater
  • Pinking Shears
  • Iron
  • Parchment Paper

INSTRUCTIONS

  1. Using your pinking shears, cut out as many beeswax wraps as you desire. The great thing about making your own is that you can customize the size to fit your dishes. I used a bigger bowl to trace circles around, and I cut around the circle I drew with the pinking shears. I made a few round ones as well as some rectangular ones.
  2. Grate your beeswax. I didn’t even use half of my block of beeswax for 10+ beeswax wraps.
  3. Taking one of your cut out fabrics, place a piece of parchment paper under it, then sprinkle some grated beeswax over it – it’ll look like you’re making a pizza. Place another piece of parchment paper over it. Take a heated iron and gently iron over it. You’ll see the wax melt into the fabric. If the melted beeswax doesn’t cover all of your fabric, sprinkle a little bit more into the missed places and iron again.

Aaand you’re pretty much done. The finished wraps will have a shine to them because of the wax.

Finished

To use it, just place on top of whatever dish you want to cover and bend the fabric around it. For bowls, I place a rubber-band around it to secure it in place. You can even use it in lieu of ziploc bags. Just wrap it around your sandwich and tie some ribbon around it.

Fancy!

The beeswax on the fabric will last about a year, depending on how often you use it. You can just grate some more beeswax and iron it back into the fabric if you feel the beeswax is fading. Also, don’t scrub the wraps with a sponge. To clean it, run it under cold water.

And that’s it! Honestly, the hardest part for me was gathering the materials and taking my ironing board out. But once I got going, making over 10 of these wraps took me less than a couple hours (and that’s with a baby and all the grating). We’ve been using these for awhile now and it works great for us. It’s also fun opening the refrigerator and seeing the bright fabrics. The main reasons I love beeswax wraps is that they 1) reduces waste while 2) being super cute.